Forget TV - Baby you're an internet star!

There is a new kind of celebrity emerging and that is the Internet Star. Forget mass media TV now anyone can become a celebrity via the internet. I'm not talking about those adult web cam performers either or even errr...what's their names at www.nakednews.com I'm talking about real media stars that deliver interesting content with all the production values of real TV shows and nothing gimmicky just to grab you're attention.

My personal favourite internet star is Karina Stenquist at www.mobuzztv.com. Karina and her team deliver a daily three minute show with humour and interesting content all whilst keeping their clothes on. The script writing on this show is tight and Karina's delivery is as good as any TV presenter - if not better. She has great timing for punchlines too. Amazing that she has no previous experience in the entertainment industry.

Not with standing the great job the Mobuzz TV team do creating such a vehicle for yourself is well within reach. The web doesn't require (and no one really expects) high quality video. Setting up a studio can be as simple as purchasing a few web cams and maybe a digital video camera for location work. (Oh and don't forget lighting - lighting is key to getting the best quality video from any camera).

All you need then is someone who knows a bit about script writing and someone who knows a bit about filming and video editing and you're in business.

Getting your content online couldn't be easier with many free sites around that will not only host your video but provide you with HTML code so you can integrate your video right into your web site. www.YouTube.com is one example of an entire video hosting community where you can not only host video but get it seen too.

So if you'd like to be almost famous like Karina at MoBuzz TV and want to be a studio mogual as well - start your own Internet TV show. Finally you can make TV like it should be - with you in a staring role.

Studio Time.

Studio Time is the time I spend in my studio actually creating an artwork...or so it has come to be defined. It seems to suggest that the actual execution is more important than the collection of ideas or time to just absorb and reflect. Perhaps I should explain.

In order to get more art done myself and some fellow artists have come up with the concept of recording 'studio time'. Essentially clocking on when you start to paint and clocking off when you're done for the day. You then set yourself a weekly quota of hours and try to reach that in studio time. The final piece of explanation is that you partner with another artist and compete to reach not just your quota but more if possible with the winner being the artist who records the most studio time over a given period.

It's a great idea in theory and works really well when you're on a role with lots of ideas pouring out of you one after the other. However when you're in a lull it becomes a lot of pressure just to produce anything.

Today I've been pottering around my studio for almost four hours. I've looked through old sketchbooks and past notes. I've played my favorite music. I've taken photos of the interior of my studio from many different angles. I saw a pink fairy out on the road which almost inspired an idea (no really I did see that. I think there was a children's party happening and I caught a glimpes of an adult women dressed as a pink fairy - complete with pink wings). I've done maybe half a sketch for an idea that faded into 'I can't really get behind that concept'.

So, having produced nothing but a bit of a sketch and 44 digital photos of various aspects of my studio, I'm now writing this. Should any of this be counted as 'studio time'?

I could've done some more work on 'The Shortest Story' which is sitting on my easel once again. Somehow it just seems wrong to finish it. Maybe it's because in the end the baby dies? Or maybe it's because over a year and a half later I've moved on.

My last painting, 'The Lord Sings from my Window Sill', looks great but was so forced to create that starting a new work seems, well... like work. The whole point of doing what I do is because I enjoy it...right?

Sometimes I look through my back catalogue of work and think that maybe my best work has already been done. Back when I really looked forward to painting, drawing and creating. I can still produce good work now but do I really want to?

Maybe I'm just doing time...Studio Time.

Kids today are smarter than their parents?

How often have you heard it said that kids today are smarter than their parents? I’ve heard it quite frequently in the media – even Dr Phil has said it. I say speak for your self. It’s not true and don’t let the media fool you.

Today’s kids may have access to more information that may give them more choices but in my experience, they only take in what they want to hear and still make stupid, uninformed decisions. Just like we used to at their age.

Like any cross section of people there will be exceptions. There are kids that are genuinely smarter, more mature and responsible for their age. However the vast majority know everything they need to know by the time they turn fourteen. They’re ‘adult’ enough to be responsible for all their own decision making so parents should just let them do what they please…right? Just like we thought at fourteen.

Don’t be fooled. Just because your son knows how to download MP3’s onto an ipod, or your daughter can chat to five friends at the same time on her mobile phone, this does not make them smarter. They just know about different stuff to you. Chances are they have no idea about wash cycles, settings for different fabrics on an iron or that vacuum cleaners have different heads for different surfaces. Many would not have a clue about fixing a leaky tap, unclogging a toilet or cleaning up a beetroot stain.

This generation is no smarter than any generation that came before. Having access to more information does not mean that your kids are accessing more information. They’re still just as self absorbed and worried about ‘being cool’ as you probably were at their age. Our kids are not smarter than their parents. Don’t let anyone tell you different – not even Dr Phil!
Related Posts with Thumbnails