Martindale Hall Revisited - Mintaro, South Australia


Back in 2007 my sister and I visited Martindale Hall, the authentic 19th century Georgian mansion, used as the 'Boarding School for Young Ladies' in the Peter Weir film 'Picnic at Hanging Rock'.




Located in the township of Mintaro, South Australia, and only a slight detour for my partner (Enigma) and I to visit, on our way from Gawler to an overnight stay in Clare for some Bukirk Glamping.

Enigma had also visited the hall many years ago so we thought we'd stop by to see whether the experience had changed much over the years.

The hall is open most days, 11am-4pm, and has an entry fee of AU$12.00 each for adults. Tours are self guided with plenty of informative signs to read in the various rooms to let you know the history and highlights of what you're seeing.

Main Hall from the stairs.
For the most part the experience was pretty much the same as I remembered it. The only real change is that it's no longer possible to actually stay at the hall due to the accommodation not being up to current standards.

If you've never been to Martindale Hall it is definitely worth a look. The rooms and history are both interesting and impressive. No flash photography is allowed but we had no trouble taking photos on our phones without flash, even though the entire hall is much more dimly lit than your average home.

Oriental soldiers ornament.
I spent most of my time taking photos of various ornaments that caught my attention rather than trying to take photos of entire rooms. It's also a great place for taking selfies of you standing next to history.

If you have explored the house before it's debatable as to whether it's worth another look. The whole point of Martindale is that it's preserved as close as possible to how it was when it was an actual home. Therefore, very little inside changes, it's all just getting older.

Sewing nook in one of the bedrooms.
You can book the hall for private functions such as weddings etc. if you really want to turn your event into something a little more memorable.

Not far up the road is the Mintaro Maze where you can get a discount on entry fee if you've already toured the hall (or vice-versa).

The best place to find information about Martindale Hall is through their Facebook Page. You can also visit their website.

4 comments:

  1. I don't think I've got this on DVD, but I ought to get it. I remember seeing it at the cinema in Whyalla on a film morning with a group. I know most people thought it was too long and a bit boring, apparently it has been walked out on. The music is very haunting though, and I love it and the scenery is magnificent. Lesley bought me the book. (I still haven't got through it as it got left)

    A member of our Writers' Circle (I don't go now) published a book about what could possibly have happened, to continue the story. I didn't get to read it though. She went to Melbourne and to the rock to research it. Had a picture of the rock on front of the book. Forgot what she titled it now. I think the film is very intriguing and I thought it was a true story at first. It's very frustrating that there is no answer to the mystery.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The author of the book did write a final chapter that was published after her death. In it the mystery of what happened to the girls is solved. Apparently it a fairly 'trippy' resolution. The books publishers thought the story was best left without the final chapter to remain a mystery. Seems they were right in their decision as the story became more famous as a result. More information at [ this link ]. At the link it also mentions a book that was written exploring possible solutions... is that the book written by your Writer's Circle member?

      Delete
  2. I enjoyed watching the trailer on here to this film, even though I didn't really want to spend over 4mns watching it and there wasn't volume on it to turn the sound down a bit, though I could have done it on my speakers I know. Once the music started though, I had to keep watching it, even for the nostalgia of remembering the film.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah it's quite a good film. The music is particularly iconic and draws you in. The film really added to the mystery by not attempting to offer any solutions either (which is kind of a spoiler but hey the film came out in 1975).

      Delete

Comments not directly related to the post will be deleted. This includes spammy generic comments with links to websites not related to the post.

Related Posts with Thumbnails