Skip to main content

The Truth About Modern Art

Paul J. Watson's video, The Truth About Modern Art popped up in my social media stream today. It's basically a rant video denouncing, mainly conceptual art, with a few other similarly criticized art movements/styles/techniques thrown in.



Paul is the editor at large for the sites PrisonPlanet and InfoWars and, based on the few videos I've watched of his, tends to lean toward the conservative side of most issues. He often makes very reasonable and valid points on issues and attempts to back up his ideas with facts and studies that support his point of view when possible.

Unfortunately Paul does come across in a way that feels like making up your own mind on his views is not an option but if you can think for yourself he does give you plenty of information to consider and research for yourself.

Getting back to Paul's video. Be sure to watch all of it below before moving on to my reasons for sharing it with you.



I can imagine this particular video would have mainstream appeal and that there is a high probability that you're also nodding in agreement too. Modern art, apparently, doesn't require much skill and, conceptual art in particular, is some kind of joke perpetuated by artists and galleries in order to make the general masses feel inferior due to their lack of understanding.

Now, I don't want to tell you how to think. You can make up your own mind about what kind of art you like. Personally, I agree with some of Paul's points except I wouldn't suggest that any of these artworks be removed, taken away or be replaced with so called 'good art'.

Honestly, if you don't like modern art, don't buy it, don't view it and let those lofty art wankers consume it all by themselves. Why step on their fun? Look for the artwork you want to see and go and support that. Don't say you can't because all the galleries are filled with modern art. Have an adventure and find those smaller, obscure galleries you don't know about. Maybe look for and support some local community art even.

As an artist myself, I enjoy modern art. Some of it presents really interesting, thought provoking ideas, some of it is just screaming out to be made fun of, and yes, some of it leaves me stunned that any gallery would even contemplate buying or showing it.

All I know is, on those occasions I've been to the South Australian State Gallery, which is at least 50% full of traditional and really beautiful art, that most people would agree is exceptional, I walk through all that section and find most of it quite boring. Which is not to say I don't like it. It just doesn't spark my imagination or fire up my "Jesus they're calling that art now" synapses.

If you want a beautiful, relaxing, pleasant experience at an art gallery then seek out whatever art you like and enjoy it. But if you want something more challenging, possibly confronting, maybe inspirational, probably baffling or just art that will make you think something, seek out modern art, and, in particular, conceptual art. You don't have to like it but try not to just dismiss it either simply because it doesn't appeal or you don't understand it.

Forget what Paul says in his video about art elites trying to make themselves seem superior - who cares what they think. What's important is what you think. There are no wrong ways to think about art.

The key is to at least think about whether the artwork is successful or not and then decide whether it's to your taste or should be dismissed as an abomination.

Art, like everything else has good, bad and mediocre examples. As with music it's subjective. Like what you like but don't assume everyone thinks the same about what you don't like.

In the big scheme of things only supporting good art leads to fewer discoveries, less expression and experimentation. Imagine how boring art would be now if it weren't for Impressionists like Claude Monet - whose first impressionist works from 1872 were disparaged by art curators of the day.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Bukirk Glamping - Camping in Style, Clare Valley, South Australia

Glamping is for those who want to experience the outdoor lifestyle of camping without foregoing the luxuries of basic motel accommodation.

Bukirk (pronounced 'Buh -kirk') Glamping, located on a rural property, in the Clare Valley, just outside of Clare, South Australia, is by far one of the best accommodation experiences my partner and I have enjoyed to date. Although Bukirk's Facebook page says you could bring a family (I guess additional bedding can be arranged?), everything is more clearly targeted at couples, looking for a romantic getaway where the accommodation is a memorable part of the experience, and not just somewhere to stay.

BEILEXING Autocycle Style ABS Cartoon Building Brick - 378pcs - COLORMIX - Motorcycle kit Product Review

The first time I saw the Beilexing Brick Motorcycle Kit I thought it was nothing short of stunning. I'm not even a fan of motorcycles in general but the detail of this set and how much it captured the spirit of a real world motorcycle really impressed me.

Then I saw the set cost considerably less than a similar sized kit from the Lego Technic range I just couldn't pass it up.

When the kit arrived it did not disappoint. Made from ABS plastic the bricks are fully compatible with, and are of comparable quality to, official Lego bricks. I did notice that the tires and chain links seemed a little less sturdy than their Lego equivalents but beyond that you'd be hard pressed to say the quality of the parts wasn't almost as good.

The model is 35.00 x 10.00 x 6.00 cm / 13.78 x 3.94 x 2.36 inches in size and should be no trouble for intermediate to advanced builders to construct with a clear, and easy to follow instruction manual.

A sheet of decals is included for you to stick …

Virtual Reality Addiction Meets Online Shopping and Death!

I'm certainly not the first person to predict the idea of immersive virtual worlds. Movies like Tron (1982) and The Lawnmower Man (1992) are two of the earliest popular culture references to the concept I can think of, off the top of my head. Then of course there is The Matrix (1999) where the VR world idea really hit the mainstream big time.

However, back in early 2005, the practice of online shopping, with real money, for digital products in virtual worlds like Second Life (which was more cutting edge back then) began to meld in my mind with the idea of corporations controlling that experience through marketing and advertising.

The Awkward Amy Schumer Interview That Wasn't Her Fault

Last week comedian Amy Schumer participated in a very awkward interview with Mamamia, Columnist/Journalist/Senior Editor (sorry I'm not sure which job description is most appropriate) Monique Bowley. The interview went so badly that Monique simply had to just own it and write about just how badly it went, and podcast about it as well. Even better the whole interview was captured on video which you can watch below as a precursor to my thoughts on the aftermath.

Movie Review: Avengers: Infinity War (2018) *Spoiler Free*

Ten years in the making and Marvel finally releases part one of the Avengers versus Thanos, A.K.A. Avengers: Infinity War.

After seeing all 18 films in the MCU prior to this, and liking most of them, I was pretty confident this movie would not disappoint.

Other than a few minor issues - that are all my personal taste and in no way reflect on the quality of the film - it really delivers. Thanos is indeed the big, bad villain of the MCU that we've been antcipating.